Seven Secrets to Rejuvenate Your Muscles at 50+

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Muscle is easy to lose as we age, as we have to work harder to build and maintain it. Age-related muscle loss, or sarcopenia, is something everyone likely encounters as they age because the body’s ability to process protein drastically decreases by age 50. Once we hit age 60, muscle mass declines on average up to 3% each year.

These seven simple steps will strengthen your body and rejuvenate your muscle health:

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  1. Slow Down Cardio: Rest days are needed for regeneration. Too much cardio may cancel out muscle gains.
  1. Start Stretching: It speeds up recovery and increases range of motion, making room for muscle fibres to grow.
  1. Stop Starving Yourself: Sending your body into starvation mode trains it to store a large percentage of fat, in the event that you skip another meal.
  1. Switch Up Your Routine: The muscles want to be challenged, or they will become stagnant.
  1. Eat After Workouts: Refueling after workouts will start the recovery process immediately, providing the nutrients your body needs in order to repair muscle and grow more of it.
  1. Get More Sleep: If you are getting less than 6 hours of sleep a day, you are limiting your body’s ability to naturally produce crucial muscle-building chemicals.
  1. Rejuvenate Muscle Health: This patented blend of essential amino acids, called Rejuvenate, has been shown in studies from the Geriatric Center at Arkansas University Medical Center to increase the body’s muscle protein synthesis and ability to rebuild and repair muscle by 57% with noticeable muscle mass improvement within 30 days. Rejuvenate has been in development for the past 17 years, and now has 25 peer-reviewed published studies to demonstrate its efficacy. Rejuvenate is available online at rejuvenatemuscle.ca.

Guest blogger: Sherry Torkos

Sherry Torkos, B.Sc.Phm., R.Ph., is a registered pharmacist, author and health enthusiast with a passion for prevention. She graduated with honours from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science in 1992. Since then, she has been practicing pharmacy using an integrative approach, combining conventional and complementary therapies to optimize health and prevent disease. Torkos has won several national pharmacy awards for providing excellence in patient care. As a leading health expert, she has delivered hundreds of lectures and is frequently interviewed by radio and TV talk shows throughout North America and abroad. Torkos has authored 18 books and booklets, including The Canadian Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine.