Hospital Faces Prosecution Over Lucy Letby’s Infanticide Spree

60

Several months after Lucy Letby, the infamous ‘killer nurse’, was convicted for the shocking murders of seven infants under her care, the case continues to take alarming turns. Now, authorities plan to consider prosecuting the very hospital that trusted Letby to care for its most vulnerable patients, over the deaths and attempted murder of an additional six infants.

Lucy Letby, 33, was handed a life sentence without the possibility of parole when found guilty of murdering seven newborn babies, and attempting the murder of six others in the hospital’s neonatal unit during 2015 and 2016.

Follow us on Google News! ✔️


Police have recently initiated a corporate manslaughter investigation against the Countess of Chester Hospital. It is suspected that the hospital was negligent in the events leading to the fatalities.

Detective Superintendent Simon Blackwell clarified that the investigation will closely review the timeline from June 2015 to June 2016 – the infamous period of Lucy Letby’s appalling killing spree. Furthermore, it will scrutinize the conduct of the individuals in “senior leadership” roles within the hospital during that time.

Despite this, Detective Superintendent Blackwell was clear that at present, “no individuals” are being probed for gross negligence manslaughter. According to UK law, organisations and enterprises can be held accountable for corporate manslaughter due to severe management failure that results in a gross breach of duty of care.

It’s been revealed that the hospital leadership had numerous chances – as many as ten – to act on concerns related to Letby’s suspected involvement in a disturbing increase in deaths or collapses in the neo-natal ward. Yet it was only after this suspicious pattern continued that the authorities were finally alerted.

Reacting to the development, Jane Tomkinson OBE, the acting chief executive officer at the Countess of Chester Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, expressed profound shock and sorrow at Lucy Letby’s criminal activities.

Around a month ago, Lucy Letby appealed her whole life order sentence. She faces retrial next year on an outstanding charge of attempted murder of a baby girl.

While Letby has consistently refused to articulate her motives or face the judgment of the court or the grieving parents, evidence and allegations suggest large-scale and intricate planning behind her horrifying actions. These include deliberately injecting air into the infants’ bloodstreams, feeding air or milk via nasogastric tubes, administering excessive insulin in intravenous feeds, and tampering with breathing tubes.

Lucy Letby was handed a rare “whole-life order” by Judge James Goss, who noted her actions bore a level of “malevolence bordering on sadism”. This severe sentence type has been handed to only three other women in the United Kingdom, underscoring the nightmarish scale of Lucy Letby’s crimes.